Coin Hoards of the Roman Empire

coin-hoards-roman-empire

The Coin Hoards of the Roman Empire Project is a joint initiative of the Ashmolean Museum and the Oxford Roman Economy Project. It is the brainchild of Baron Lorne Thyssen-Bornemisza and is funded by the Augustus Foundation. It intends to fill a major lacuna in the digital coverage of coin hoards from antiquity. It aims to collect information about hoards of all coinages in use in the Roman Empire between approximately 30 BC and AD 400. Imperial Coinage forms the main focus of the project, but Iron Age and Roman Provincial coinages in circulation within this period are also included to give a complete picture of the monetary systems of both the West and the East. In 2019 the scope of the Project was extended to include hoards of Roman coins from outside the Empire. The intention of the Project is to provide the foundations for a systematic Empire-wide study of hoarding and to promote the integration of numismatic data into broader research on the Roman Economy.

Visit the Coin Hoards of the Roman Empire site now …

PELLA: Philip II Gold and Silver Coins

Philip-II-coins

After considerable effort by ANS curator Peter van Alfen, the gold and silver coin types of Philip II of Macedon have been published to PELLA. This typology, based on Georges Le Rider’s 1977 Le monnayage d’argent et d’or de Philippe II frappé en Macédoine de 359 à 294, has been numbered 1-382. Le Rider’s corpus is actually a die study, and the numbering system is based on die combinations rather than types. As such, there are about 2,200 or so die combinations that correspond to the 382 types. These types were given a new numbering scheme, pella.philip_ii.1 to 382, but all of the Le Rider numbers are also URIs in order to establish a concordance between Le Rider and the new scheme so that collections that cataloged their coins with Le Rider numbers can submit their RDF with those URIs or map the Le Rider to the PELLA type number.

Digging for wisdom

IMG_9183Digging for wisdom: Archaeology as a resource in the religion class

Date: Friday, 29 May 2020 (from 9.00am)
Venue: Old Bishopsbourne, St Francis Theological College, Brisbane

The first archaeologists were little more than treasures hunters. Think Indiana Jones. During the past 100 years archaeology has matured to become a multi-disciplinary research project seeking to understand the past rather than acquire marvellous objects for the collections of Western imperial powers. Properly used, archaeology can enrich the religion class and contribute to the quest for spiritual wisdom.

Presenter: Dr Greg Jenks is Dean of Grafton Cathedral and a co-director of the Bethsaida Archaeology Project in Israel. His primary research interests are Nazareth in the first century and the coins from Bethsaida. Dr Jenks is also the Director of the Centre for Coins, Culture and Religious History, based at St John’s Cathedral in Brisbane.

Registrations: Email Anglican Schools Commission