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Reformation @ Grafton

CCCRH-Ethiopian-Bible

The CCCRH travelling exhibition developed to mark the 500th anniversary of the Protestant Reformation in Europe has now moved to Grafton.

During Lent the materials will be on display at the Cathedral Bookshop, during opening hours: 9.30am–4.30pm, Tuesday–Friday.

Grafton Cathedral Reformation Exhibition

After the exhibition concludes at the end of Holy Week, it will then be hosted at several Anglican Schools across the Diocese of Grafton.

To register your interest in hosting this exhibition in your parish, school or other organisation, please email us.

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Seleucid Coins Online (SCO)

SCO logoAs a component of the National Endowment of the Humanities funded Hellenistic Royal Coinages project, Seleucid Coins Online (SCO) is a new research tool providing a comprehensive overview of the coinages struck by the Seleucid kings between ca. 320 BC and 64 BC.

The current version of SCO is based on Seleucid Coins: A Comprehensive Catalogue by Arthur Houghton, Catharine Lorber, and Oliver Hoover, published in two parts in 2002 and 2008 by American Numismatic Society and Classical Numismatic Group, Inc. The first part, by Houghton and Lorber, presented and interpreted all the numismatic material for Seleucus I to Antiochus III known up to 2002. The second part, by Houghton, Lorber, and Hoover, did the same for the Seleucid kings from Seleucus IV to Antiochus XIII. In total, more than 2,491 primary coin types were published in these volumes.

Ultimately, SCO will provide wide access to the coins listed in the print volumes of Seleucid Coins—not only the entries in the main catalogue, but also pieces presented separately in the appendices (e.g., plated issues, non-Seleucid coins bearing Seleucid countermarks, etc.). While the Seleucid coins in the ANS collection (some 5,129 pieces) serve as the core of the searchable catalogue, all types in the original publications will be included in the database, ultimately with links to coins (many of which are unique) in the Bibliothèque nationale de France, the British Museum, the Munzkabinett der Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, and many other public and private collections. When necessary, entries in the catalogue will provide corrections to descriptions and interpretation with explanatory commentary by Oliver Hoover.

20,000+ Roman Republican coins added to CRRO

CRRO LogoIn a watershed moment for Roman Republican numismatics, 20,237 coins with high-resolution IIIF images from the Bibliothèque nationale de France have been incorporated into the Nomisma.org SPARQL endpoint, and are therefore available in Coinage of the Roman Republic Online. This nearly doubles the coverage of Republican coinage–there had previously been about 26,000 coins available through CRRO from 18 museums or archaeological databases (like the Portable Antiquities Scheme).

Whose head is on the coin?

The coin that appears in the famous incident when Jesus is challenged about paying taxes to the Roman authorities (Mark 12:13–17) has attracted considerable attention from both biblical scholars and numismatists.

CCCRH researcher, Dr Peter Lewis, has considered this episode over many years, and the latest version of his paper on “The Denarius in Mark 12:15” is now available on the CCCRH web site.

>>> Read the full essay online..

 

Manuscripts in St Catherine’s Monastery Library, Mt Sinai

The remote monastery dedicated to St Catherine at the foot of Mt Sinai has recently made the news after an attack by gunmen affiliated with the Islamic State.

It is valued by pilgrims and scholars for its religious heritage, and especially its rich library with more than 3,000 manuscripts, most famously the Codex Sinaiticus—the oldest copy of the Bible, and possibly the only substantial book to have survived from the days of the Roman Empire.

The Library of Congress in Washington, DC has an extensive microfilm collection with details of the collection at St Catherine’s shortly after the end of World War II. The LOC web site describes these materials as follows:

In 1949, Kenneth W. Clark, led an expedition to the Middle East under the auspices of the Library of Congress and its partners, to microfilm old manuscripts in various libraries of the Middle East, the largest and most isolated of which was that at St. Catherine’s. His group evaluated the 3,300 manuscripts held there and chose 1,687 for filming.  Finally, the group also prepared under his direction a Checklist of Manuscripts in St. Catherine’s Monastery, Mount Sinai Microfilmed for the Library of Congress (1950), which gave researchers access to both the manuscripts microfilms and the black and white transparencies. The microfilm collection is in the custody of the Humanities and Social Sciences Division, where it still may be requested.

The Library of Congress has recently the digitized microfilms prepared by the Clark expedition in 1949 so that the material can be accessed by scholars around the world. The descriptions of the manuscripts in the Checklist have also been edited and updated as part this process.

>> LOC Manuscripts in St Catherine’s Monastery, Mt Sinai

 

The Cathedral Coins: A History of Christianity in Coins

CCCRH is pleased to publish online, The Cathedral Coins: A History of Christianity in Coins, a richly illustrated guide to the Cathedral Coin Collection at St John’s Anglican Cathedral, Brisbane.

Hard copies of the booklet are available for purchase at the Cathedral Shop, but Dean Peter Catt has given CCCRH permission to make the material available online.

The coin collection of St John’s Anglican Cathedral in Ann Street, Brisbane features coins relevant to biblical studies and church history. A selection of the coins is displayed in a secure cabinet behind the choir stalls on the southern side of the Cathedral.

You can download the booklet-web from the CCCRH web site as a PDF.

OCRE launches new interface

After years of discussion and development work, a new interface for Online Coins of the Roman Empire that will aid in the identification of Roman imperial coins by non-specialists (archaeologists and collectors alike). The developers hope that this will be especially useful for badly worn coins discovered in archaeological excavation. Like the rest of OCRE and other ANS web projects, this interface is responsive to devices of various sizes, making it ideal for use on mobile phones and tablets in the field.

CCCRH Archive Grows

The collection of coin research papers available via the Centre for Coins, Culture and Religious History  web site has expanded considerably in the last few days.

Almost 50 articles written by CCCRH Researcher, Dr Peter E. Lewis, for publication in The Australasian Coin & Banknote Magazine have now been added to the CCCRH site.

Additional articles will be added in the future, as the editor of the magazine has agreed for CCCRH to publish all of Dr Lewis’ work on our site.

Because of the number of articles involved and their original publication in The Australasian Coin & Banknote Magazine, we have created a dedicated page for these research articles that range across a diverse array of topics.

We appreciate the support of The Australasian Coin & Banknote Magazine as we develop this new project, and we are glad to make Peter’s original research available to a wider audience in this way.

Preparing to launch

The Centre for Coins, Culture and Religious History has not yet been launched. But work is well underway on the establishment of this new centre for research and education.

We have many of the key elements in place, most importantly an impressive collection of coins, icons, manuscripts and religious objects.

We have an outline of the mission for CCCRH and its core activities.

We have an Executive Director and at least one research associate, and are currently inviting other colleagues with interests in the areas we address to join us.

We are about to have discussions with key institutional partners here in Brisbane to determine the most appropriate physical and organisational location for the Centre.

We anticipate good progress being made during the next few weeks, and hope to have an official launch for the Centre by mid-2017.

In the meantime, we appreciate your interest and encouragement as we develop this new project.

Gregory C. Jenks
Executive Director

151113 SGC Dean