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Digital British Numismatic Journal

medal_100pxThe British Numismatic Journal (BNJ) is the Society’s principal publication and has been published since 1903. The Society has recently made a complete digital archive of all issues of the BNJ to 2007 freely available to download. New and recent volumes will be made available five years after publication.

In late 2011, large PDF files of entire volumes were made freely available on the society’s web space. In 2012, the volumes have been split into their constituent articles and made available to search via a google search bar on the page.

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Albert Schweitzer on the Road

Schweitzer

Albert Schweitzer is not such a familiar name among younger people these days, but the students at Emmaus College at Jimboomba were enthralled by a recent CCCRH travelling exhibition that featured his amazing life and work.

Schweitzer was born on 14 January 1875 and died—more than 90 years later—on 4 September 1965). Coming from the French-German border areas, Schweitzer represented the best of the cultural currents of his day. He excelled as a theologian, organist, writer, humanitarian, philosopher, and physician. He was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1952 and his contribution to biblical scholarship remain of interest to new generations of students, even if they no longer shape the field.

Books, medallions, coins and stamps were on display at Emma’s College for students and staff to experience first-hand. In addition, there was a letter and a signed postcard written by the man himself. The visiting collection had a big impact on many in the school community.

Emmaus-Scweitzer

Assistant Principal Religious Education Tony Bourke noted, “it was a privilege to be able to share the Schweitzer story with our students”.

There was an overwhelmingly positive response with over 500 students viewing the display. Students volunteered feeling in awe of being so close to such a display of historical artefacts, and even being allowed to pick them up.

I loved the coin and the stamps!
Jack M 7FLEA

The display was really good. The medals and the stamps are really amazing. Talia A 7FLEA

I can’t believe we have a display like this in our school.
Harrison D 9COAR

Students understood the huge privilege they had been granted and were justifiably impressed; many noting that they couldn’t believe that someone had shared their treasures so generously.

The Schweitzer Exhibition is now available for loan to other schools and churches wishing to host the material for a week or two at a time.

Enquiries to the Executive Director, Dr Gregory C. Jenks: 0426067344

American Numismatic Society eBooks

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Over its 150-year history, the American Numismatic Society has published hundreds of monographs. Many of these were scanned by the Google Books project and are now openly accessible through HathiTrust. However, these scanned books provide little functionality for keyword searches or linking to related resources in the archives or numismatic collection of the ANS. As a result, we are publishing fully functional Open Access ebooks through our Digital Library, including EPUB and PDF derivatives for mobile devices.

–> eBooks

Just in Time for Passover

Just in Time for Passover: Dozens of “Freedom Coins” from Jewish Revolt against Rome (66-70 C.E.) discovered in Cave near Jerusalem Temple Mount

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Photo Credit: Eilat Mazar/Hebrew University

Jerusalem, March 26, 2018—Bronze coins, the last remnants of a four-year Jewish revolt against the Roman Empire were found near the Temple Mount in Jerusalem. These bronze coins were discovered by Hebrew University archaeologist Dr. Eilat Mazar during renewed excavations at the Ophel, located below the Temple Mount’s southern wall.

These 1.5cm bronze coins were left behind by Jewish residents who hid in a large cave (7×14 meters) for four years (66-70 C.E.)—from the Roman siege of Jerusalem, up until the destruction of the Second Temple and the city of Jerusalem.

While several of the coins date to the early years of the revolt, the great majority are from its final year, otherwise known as, “Year Four” (69-70 CE).  Significantly, during the final year, the Hebrew inscription on the coins was changed from “For the Freedom of Zion” to “For the Redemption of Zion”, a shift which reflects the changing mood of the rebels during this period of horror and famine.

“A discovery like this—ancient coins bearing the words “Freedom” and “Redemption”—found right before the Jewish Festival of Freedom—Passover—begins is incredibly moving”, shared Dr. Mazar.

In addition to Hebrew inscriptions, the coins were decorated with Jewish symbols, such as the four biblical plant species: palm, myrtle, citron and willow, and a picture of the goblet that was used in the Temple service.

Many broken pottery vessels, including jars and cooking pots, were also found in the cave.  According to Mazar, it is remarkable that this cave was never discovered by subsequent residents of Jerusalem nor used again after the Second Temple period.  In this way the cave acts as a veritable time capsule of life in Jerusalem under the siege and during the four-year revolt against the Roman Empire.

These finds all date back to the time of the rebellion and were found in the Ophel Cave directly above a Hasmonean Period layer that was situated at the base of the cave.  A more complete report of these findings will be published in the third volume of the Ophel excavations; the second is being published this week.

According to Mazar, the coins were well preserved, probably because they were in use for such a short time.  A similar number of “Year Four” coins were found near Robinson’s Arch, near the Western Wall, by Professor Benjamin Mazar, Eilat Mazar’s grandfather.  He conducted the Temple Mount excavations right after Israel’s Six Day War, on behalf of Hebrew University’s Institute of Archaeology.

The Ophel excavations are situated within the Walls Around Jerusalem National Park, which is managed by the National Parks and Gardens Authority and the Eastern Jerusalem Development Company. Funding was generously provided by the Herbert W. Armstrong College of Edmond, Oklahoma, whose students participate in the digs.

 SOURCE: News release from the Hebrew University in Jerusalem, 26 March 2018.

Reformation @ Grafton

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The CCCRH travelling exhibition developed to mark the 500th anniversary of the Protestant Reformation in Europe has now moved to Grafton.

During Lent the materials will be on display at the Cathedral Bookshop, during opening hours: 9.30am–4.30pm, Tuesday–Friday.

Grafton Cathedral Reformation Exhibition

After the exhibition concludes at the end of Holy Week, it will then be hosted at several Anglican Schools across the Diocese of Grafton.

To register your interest in hosting this exhibition in your parish, school or other organisation, please email us.

Seleucid Coins Online (SCO)

SCO logoAs a component of the National Endowment of the Humanities funded Hellenistic Royal Coinages project, Seleucid Coins Online (SCO) is a new research tool providing a comprehensive overview of the coinages struck by the Seleucid kings between ca. 320 BC and 64 BC.

The current version of SCO is based on Seleucid Coins: A Comprehensive Catalogue by Arthur Houghton, Catharine Lorber, and Oliver Hoover, published in two parts in 2002 and 2008 by American Numismatic Society and Classical Numismatic Group, Inc. The first part, by Houghton and Lorber, presented and interpreted all the numismatic material for Seleucus I to Antiochus III known up to 2002. The second part, by Houghton, Lorber, and Hoover, did the same for the Seleucid kings from Seleucus IV to Antiochus XIII. In total, more than 2,491 primary coin types were published in these volumes.

Ultimately, SCO will provide wide access to the coins listed in the print volumes of Seleucid Coins—not only the entries in the main catalogue, but also pieces presented separately in the appendices (e.g., plated issues, non-Seleucid coins bearing Seleucid countermarks, etc.). While the Seleucid coins in the ANS collection (some 5,129 pieces) serve as the core of the searchable catalogue, all types in the original publications will be included in the database, ultimately with links to coins (many of which are unique) in the Bibliothèque nationale de France, the British Museum, the Munzkabinett der Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, and many other public and private collections. When necessary, entries in the catalogue will provide corrections to descriptions and interpretation with explanatory commentary by Oliver Hoover.

20,000+ Roman Republican coins added to CRRO

CRRO LogoIn a watershed moment for Roman Republican numismatics, 20,237 coins with high-resolution IIIF images from the Bibliothèque nationale de France have been incorporated into the Nomisma.org SPARQL endpoint, and are therefore available in Coinage of the Roman Republic Online. This nearly doubles the coverage of Republican coinage–there had previously been about 26,000 coins available through CRRO from 18 museums or archaeological databases (like the Portable Antiquities Scheme).

Whose head is on the coin?

The coin that appears in the famous incident when Jesus is challenged about paying taxes to the Roman authorities (Mark 12:13–17) has attracted considerable attention from both biblical scholars and numismatists.

CCCRH researcher, Dr Peter Lewis, has considered this episode over many years, and the latest version of his paper on “The Denarius in Mark 12:15” is now available on the CCCRH web site.

>>> Read the full essay online..