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Three new coin studies

The following articles that first appeared in the Australasian Coin and Banknote Magazine have now been added to our online archives:

October 2018 – The Remarkable Coins of King Offa
September 2018 – Pulcheria – Woman of Influence
August 2018 – A New Coin of Tiberius

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Seleucid Coins Online update

Seleucid Coins Online is [mostly] complete and published

From the Numishare blog
After a few months of continuous work on normalizing data and fixing some type numbering issues, Seleucid Coins Online has been updated and completed (with the exception of some typos or missing type/subtype records we might invariably find). There are now 2,519 total coin types from Seleucus I until late Roman Republican and early Augustan types issued with under the stated authority of Philip I (posthumously). There are about 6,000 subtypes nested hierarchically under these parent types, and more than 2,000 physical specimens from the ANS, Berlin, Muenster, Harvard Art Museums, and the Fralin Museum of Art at the University of Virginia have been linked to SCO, either at a higher parent type level (for worn coins) or at the specific subtype when an accurate identification can be made. Oliver Hoover is still working on cataloging later Seleucid coins in the ANS collection, so the coverage will be expanded in the near future.

American Numismatic Society Publications Online

From AWOL, the Ancient World Online service:

540 American Numismatic Society publications are now available in the Hathi Trust Digital Library as full-text for free use by the public.

In a sweeping effort to make its older and out-of‐print publications available to the public as Open Access, The American Numismatic Society has partnered with HathiTrust. As a result of this partnership scans of nearly 550 ANS titles – including the American Journal of Numismatics, Numismatic Literature, Numismatic Notes and Monographs, and stand-­alone monographs have become fully readable and downloadable to anyone who wants them under a Creative Commons, non-­commercial, attribution, share-­alike license. This means that these ANS publications can be used for personal reading, research, and academic publication just so long as the ANS is cited as the source. Titles currently in the public domain – already have a home on HathiTrust. These volumes were OCR-scanned as part of the Google Books project.

HathiTrust, founded in 2008 by the member universities of the Committee on Institutional Cooperation and the University of California, is a large, collaborative repository of digital content from research libraries and publishers that includes content digitized by Google Books and Internet Archive and Microsoft. Millions of volumes are available via HathiTrust’s website. The entire repository can be full-text searched.

The coins of Ephesus

CCCRH has recently published a series of three articles by Dr Peter Lewis on the coins of Ephesus.

These first appeared in the May, June and July 2018 issues of the Australasian Coin and Banknote Magazine, and are republished here with the permission of the editor.

The three articles offer a detailed discussion of selected coins from the ancient city of Ephesus and will be supplemented by another on a new coin of Tiberius that was minted at Ephesus. That study appeared in the August issue of the magazine and will be available online shortly.

Digital British Numismatic Journal

medal_100pxThe British Numismatic Journal (BNJ) is the Society’s principal publication and has been published since 1903. The Society has recently made a complete digital archive of all issues of the BNJ to 2007 freely available to download. New and recent volumes will be made available five years after publication.

In late 2011, large PDF files of entire volumes were made freely available on the society’s web space. In 2012, the volumes have been split into their constituent articles and made available to search via a google search bar on the page.

Albert Schweitzer on the Road

Schweitzer

Albert Schweitzer is not such a familiar name among younger people these days, but the students at Emmaus College at Jimboomba were enthralled by a recent CCCRH travelling exhibition that featured his amazing life and work.

Schweitzer was born on 14 January 1875 and died—more than 90 years later—on 4 September 1965). Coming from the French-German border areas, Schweitzer represented the best of the cultural currents of his day. He excelled as a theologian, organist, writer, humanitarian, philosopher, and physician. He was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1952 and his contribution to biblical scholarship remain of interest to new generations of students, even if they no longer shape the field.

Books, medallions, coins and stamps were on display at Emma’s College for students and staff to experience first-hand. In addition, there was a letter and a signed postcard written by the man himself. The visiting collection had a big impact on many in the school community.

Emmaus-Scweitzer

Assistant Principal Religious Education Tony Bourke noted, “it was a privilege to be able to share the Schweitzer story with our students”.

There was an overwhelmingly positive response with over 500 students viewing the display. Students volunteered feeling in awe of being so close to such a display of historical artefacts, and even being allowed to pick them up.

I loved the coin and the stamps!
Jack M 7FLEA

The display was really good. The medals and the stamps are really amazing. Talia A 7FLEA

I can’t believe we have a display like this in our school.
Harrison D 9COAR

Students understood the huge privilege they had been granted and were justifiably impressed; many noting that they couldn’t believe that someone had shared their treasures so generously.

The Schweitzer Exhibition is now available for loan to other schools and churches wishing to host the material for a week or two at a time.

Enquiries to the Executive Director, Dr Gregory C. Jenks: 0426067344

American Numismatic Society eBooks

ANS_Header

Over its 150-year history, the American Numismatic Society has published hundreds of monographs. Many of these were scanned by the Google Books project and are now openly accessible through HathiTrust. However, these scanned books provide little functionality for keyword searches or linking to related resources in the archives or numismatic collection of the ANS. As a result, we are publishing fully functional Open Access ebooks through our Digital Library, including EPUB and PDF derivatives for mobile devices.

–> eBooks

Just in Time for Passover

Just in Time for Passover: Dozens of “Freedom Coins” from Jewish Revolt against Rome (66-70 C.E.) discovered in Cave near Jerusalem Temple Mount

2018-OphelJewishRevoltCoins

Photo Credit: Eilat Mazar/Hebrew University

Jerusalem, March 26, 2018—Bronze coins, the last remnants of a four-year Jewish revolt against the Roman Empire were found near the Temple Mount in Jerusalem. These bronze coins were discovered by Hebrew University archaeologist Dr. Eilat Mazar during renewed excavations at the Ophel, located below the Temple Mount’s southern wall.

These 1.5cm bronze coins were left behind by Jewish residents who hid in a large cave (7×14 meters) for four years (66-70 C.E.)—from the Roman siege of Jerusalem, up until the destruction of the Second Temple and the city of Jerusalem.

While several of the coins date to the early years of the revolt, the great majority are from its final year, otherwise known as, “Year Four” (69-70 CE).  Significantly, during the final year, the Hebrew inscription on the coins was changed from “For the Freedom of Zion” to “For the Redemption of Zion”, a shift which reflects the changing mood of the rebels during this period of horror and famine.

“A discovery like this—ancient coins bearing the words “Freedom” and “Redemption”—found right before the Jewish Festival of Freedom—Passover—begins is incredibly moving”, shared Dr. Mazar.

In addition to Hebrew inscriptions, the coins were decorated with Jewish symbols, such as the four biblical plant species: palm, myrtle, citron and willow, and a picture of the goblet that was used in the Temple service.

Many broken pottery vessels, including jars and cooking pots, were also found in the cave.  According to Mazar, it is remarkable that this cave was never discovered by subsequent residents of Jerusalem nor used again after the Second Temple period.  In this way the cave acts as a veritable time capsule of life in Jerusalem under the siege and during the four-year revolt against the Roman Empire.

These finds all date back to the time of the rebellion and were found in the Ophel Cave directly above a Hasmonean Period layer that was situated at the base of the cave.  A more complete report of these findings will be published in the third volume of the Ophel excavations; the second is being published this week.

According to Mazar, the coins were well preserved, probably because they were in use for such a short time.  A similar number of “Year Four” coins were found near Robinson’s Arch, near the Western Wall, by Professor Benjamin Mazar, Eilat Mazar’s grandfather.  He conducted the Temple Mount excavations right after Israel’s Six Day War, on behalf of Hebrew University’s Institute of Archaeology.

The Ophel excavations are situated within the Walls Around Jerusalem National Park, which is managed by the National Parks and Gardens Authority and the Eastern Jerusalem Development Company. Funding was generously provided by the Herbert W. Armstrong College of Edmond, Oklahoma, whose students participate in the digs.

 SOURCE: News release from the Hebrew University in Jerusalem, 26 March 2018.