Whose head is on the coin?

The coin that appears in the famous incident when Jesus is challenged about paying taxes to the Roman authorities (Mark 12:13–17) has attracted considerable attention from both biblical scholars and numismatists.

CCCRH researcher, Dr Peter Lewis, has considered this episode over many years, and the latest version of his paper on “The Denarius in Mark 12:15” is now available on the CCCRH web site.

>>> Read the full essay online..

 

Advertisements

Manuscripts in St Catherine’s Monastery Library, Mt Sinai

The remote monastery dedicated to St Catherine at the foot of Mt Sinai has recently made the news after an attack by gunmen affiliated with the Islamic State.

It is valued by pilgrims and scholars for its religious heritage, and especially its rich library with more than 3,000 manuscripts, most famously the Codex Sinaiticus—the oldest copy of the Bible, and possibly the only substantial book to have survived from the days of the Roman Empire.

The Library of Congress in Washington, DC has an extensive microfilm collection with details of the collection at St Catherine’s shortly after the end of World War II. The LOC web site describes these materials as follows:

In 1949, Kenneth W. Clark, led an expedition to the Middle East under the auspices of the Library of Congress and its partners, to microfilm old manuscripts in various libraries of the Middle East, the largest and most isolated of which was that at St. Catherine’s. His group evaluated the 3,300 manuscripts held there and chose 1,687 for filming.  Finally, the group also prepared under his direction a Checklist of Manuscripts in St. Catherine’s Monastery, Mount Sinai Microfilmed for the Library of Congress (1950), which gave researchers access to both the manuscripts microfilms and the black and white transparencies. The microfilm collection is in the custody of the Humanities and Social Sciences Division, where it still may be requested.

The Library of Congress has recently the digitized microfilms prepared by the Clark expedition in 1949 so that the material can be accessed by scholars around the world. The descriptions of the manuscripts in the Checklist have also been edited and updated as part this process.

>> LOC Manuscripts in St Catherine’s Monastery, Mt Sinai

 

The Cathedral Coins: A History of Christianity in Coins

CCCRH is pleased to publish online, The Cathedral Coins: A History of Christianity in Coins, a richly illustrated guide to the Cathedral Coin Collection at St John’s Anglican Cathedral, Brisbane.

Hard copies of the booklet are available for purchase at the Cathedral Shop, but Dean Peter Catt has given CCCRH permission to make the material available online.

The coin collection of St John’s Anglican Cathedral in Ann Street, Brisbane features coins relevant to biblical studies and church history. A selection of the coins is displayed in a secure cabinet behind the choir stalls on the southern side of the Cathedral.

You can download the booklet-web from the CCCRH web site as a PDF.

OCRE launches new interface

After years of discussion and development work, a new interface for Online Coins of the Roman Empire that will aid in the identification of Roman imperial coins by non-specialists (archaeologists and collectors alike). The developers hope that this will be especially useful for badly worn coins discovered in archaeological excavation. Like the rest of OCRE and other ANS web projects, this interface is responsive to devices of various sizes, making it ideal for use on mobile phones and tablets in the field.